Intel Gigabit CT kext for macOS Sierra 10.12

macos-sierraThe Intel Gigabit CT Desktop ethernet PCI adapter is still one of the fastest and most robust NICs for the Hackintosh. This did not change with macOS Sierra 10.12. I’m still using the IONetworkingFamilyInjector.kext in Clover’s kext folder to override the compatibility list in Apple’s own Intel82574L.kext. However, while the installation of macOS Sierra went smoothly, I lost all network connectivity after installing Sierra. A quick look at the network kernel extensions revealed that Apple changed the driver identifier of the Intel82574L.kext, rendering the injector useless. After changing the identifier in the injector and a reboot, network connectivity was back again.

The patched injector kext is available for download here: IONetworkingFamilyInjector.kext_.macos-sierra.zip. The kext injector has to be placed into the EFI/CLOVER/kexts/10.12 folder.

intel gigabit desktop ct

The Hackintosh is still running in full protected mode (if enabled in Clover):
$ csrutil status
System Integrity Protection status: enabled.

A permanent solution?

While writing this post, I stumbled upon an alternative solution, which seems to be permanent. However, it requires flashing the Intel NIC and changing it’s device ID property. Check out this post on InsanelyMac. I’m going to try this approach in the near future since it would reduce the number of kexts in my Hackintosh rig to just one (only FakeSMC).

Installing Ubuntu Server 16.04 on PC Engines APU or APU2

Most people use PC Engines APU series (APU1D4, APU2C4) system boards for pfSense firewalls (pfSense is awesome!). However, the Ubuntu Server x86-64 version runs on these boards very well too which can turn them into a lightweight, portable Plex Media Server for instance. The APU series doesn’t have a video port, that’s why the Ubuntu Server 16.04 image requires some modifications in order to use the serial port for console output instead. Since the Ubuntu image is using a read-only CD-ROM filesystem, I’m using UNetbootin to create a bootable Live USB drive which lets me modify files. While UNetbootin is available on Linux and MacOS too, only the Windows version gave me consistent results after formatting the USB drive to FAT32 file format. YMMW, but if you get weird bootloader errors, try formatting/creating the bootable drive on Windows.

To access the APU’s serial port, a RS-232 DB9 null-modem to USB interface is required and some software to connect to it. I’m using a Prolific PL-2303 based interface and minicom on Linux or Serial when I’m on my Mac.

Once the Live USB drive has been successfully prepared by UNetbootin, the following files have to be modified in order to send the console output over the serial port:

In /isolinux/isolinux.cfg, insert the following lines at the top:

serial 0 115200
console 0

In /isolinux/txt.cfg, the replace the first occurrence of the append keyword (in the “install” section) with:

append file=/cdrom/preseed/ubuntu-server.seed vga=off initrd=/install/initrd.gz -- console=ttyS0,115200n8 -

In /syslinux.cfg, insert the following lines at the top:

serial 0 115200
console 0

Again in /syslinux.cfg, replace the first occurrence of the append keyword (in the “unetbootindefault” section) with:

append initrd=/ubninit vga=off console=ttyS0,115200n8 --

Using the serial cable you should now be able to install Ubuntu Server 16.04 on the APU:

apu-ubuntu-serial-console-1apu-ubuntu-serial-console-2

During the installation:

  • Make sure the APU is connected to a router. While configuring the network, always keep in mind that the rightmost network port ist the first port (eth0 or enp1s0)
  • Make sure to include “OpenSSH server” when choosing software to install

Most likely, there won’t be any visible console output (i.e. a login prompt) after the first reboot because the installer didn’t add the necessary parameters to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX. This is where the SSH daemon comes in handy (-:

To fix this, use SSH to login to the server and modify /etc/default/grub to include the following line:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="console=tty0 console=ttyS0,115200n8"

Run update-grub , reboot the APU and eventually there should be a login prompt:

apu-ubuntu-serial-console-3

Adding a DS3231 Real Time Clock to the Raspberry Pi 3

ds3231-rtcSince the Raspberry Pi 3 doesn’t come with a battery-powered real time clock, it will only show the correct time once it has Internet connectivity (thanks to the NTP daemon). If the Raspberry Pi 3 is not connected to the Internet, you might want to add a hardware clock to set the current date. Here’s how to add a DS3231 real time clock GPIO module to the Raspberry Pi 3 in Raspbian Jessy Lite:

  1. Get a DS3231 real time clock module and install it on the GPIO header of the Raspberry Pi 3 on pin 1
  2. Add the following line at the end of /boot/config.txt in Raspbian Jessy:
    dtoverlay=i2c-rtc,ds3231
  3. We don’t need fake-hwclock anymore:
    apt-get purge fake-hwclock
  4. Check/set the current system time and write the system time to the RTC module using:
    hwclock -w
  5. Set the correct time zone using:
    dpkg-reconfigure tzdata
  6. Edit /etc/rc.local and add the hwclock command above the line that says “exit 0”:
    /sbin/hwclock -s
  7. The /etc/init.d/hwclock.sh shell scripts tends to corrupt this RTC clock module. In my case, the RTC clock was set to 2066/01/01 after every reboot. To prevent this from happening, edit /etc/default/hwclock and set HWCLOCKACCESS to no:
    HWCLOCKACCESS=no
  8. Reboot
  9. Done! Raspbian will now set the time from the RTC clock during boot even if there is no Internet connectivity available.
  10. If RTC corruption is still happening, you may have to get rid of the NTP daemon as well using:
    apt-get purge ntp
    apt-get install ntpdate
  11. After the NTP daemon has been removed, you can still sync the system clock using ntpdate-debian which you might add to /etc/rc.local as well (after the hwclock command though) – just in case there is an Internet connection available during boot. And/or add it to /etc/cron.daily for example.

Raspbian Jessy Lite will detect the DS3231 real time clock module automatically (as a DS1307 module but nevermind), there’s no need to whitelist or blacklist any I2C modules. There’s no need to run the i2cdetect command from the i2c-tools package. Once the clock module is detected, this line should be visible using dmesg:

# dmesg | grep rtc
[    6.640799] rtc-ds1307 1-0068: rtc core: registered ds3231 as rtc0

Check /proc/driver/rtc for more data on the RTC:

# cat /proc/driver/rtc
rtc_time : 19:26:18
rtc_date : 2016-03-25
alrm_time : 00:00:00
alrm_date : 1970-01-01
alarm_IRQ : no
alrm_pending : no
update IRQ enabled : no
periodic IRQ enabled : no
periodic IRQ frequency : 1
max user IRQ frequency : 64
24hr : yes

Best budget Linux laptop 2016

Recently, I’ve replaced my five year old 13″ MacBook Air with a new budget Linux laptop. Since I’ve been using Linux desktops more and more there was just no point in buying another Apple product. The time was ripe to go fully Linux on my to-go laptop.

When I started evaluating laptops I quickly realized that even in 2016 it’s still nearly impossible to buy a new laptop with full Linux driver support. Linux and mobile hardware support is somewhat like a good red wine, it gets better over time. One notable exception is the Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition which comes with a preloaded Ubuntu Desktop operating system. I’m not sure if Dell still sells an updated version of the Developer Edition model but it was not available in my country and I didn’t want to shell out more than $800 for my new laptop anyway.

Best budget Linux laptop

When it comes to portable computers, I’m probably kinda old-school. I don’t need a touch screen (fingerprints everywhere, eeek!) or some funky 2-in-1 tablet/laptop convertible like the Dell Yoga. Just a slim, lightweight 13″ laptop with a nice display (preferably matte), a battery-friendly processor, flash-based storage and a couple of full-size USB 3.0 ports for a decent price. After looking at a half dozen or so potential candidates I’ve set my eyes on the ASUS Zenbook UX305CA with the 6th gen. Intel Skylake mobile processor.

best budget linux laptop

Continue reading

Tips & tricks for the PC Engines APU

Being somewhat addicted to Linux mini computers, I just had to lay my hands on a PC Engines APU. A lot of information about the APU is strewn all over the Internet so I wanted to consolidate it all in one single post.

Installing Ubuntu Server using the serial console

To boot the Ubuntu Server installer using the serial console, some startup config files have to be modified. See this post for instructions.

On the Mac, I’m using serial. It already contains the drivers for my PL2303 based USB serial adapter. As a free alternative, Prolific’s PL2303 OS X drivers work pretty well together with minicom from the brew project. If output is being displayed with minicom but input doesn’t work, make sure to turn off hardware flow control. The screen command may work as well.

Show network devices as eth0, eth1, eth2 instead of p4p1, p4p2, p4p3

Edit /etc/default/grub as follows:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="biosdevname=0"

Update grub configuration
# update-grub
and
# reboot

Don’t forget to update /etc/network/interfaces accordingly.

Show output during boot

Edit /etc/default/grub as follows:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="console=tty0 console=ttyS0,115200n8"
GRUB_TERMINAL=serial
GRUB_SERIAL_COMMAND="serial --speed=115200 --unit=0 --word=8 --parity=no --stop=1"

Update grub configuration
# update-grub
and
# reboot

Enable NMI Watchdog

# modprobe sp5100_tco && echo "sp5100_tco" >> /etc/modules

Enable temperatur sensor

apt-get install lm-sensors

# sensors
k10temp-pci-00c3
Adapter: PCI adapter
temp1:        +52.0°C  (high = +70.0°C)
                       (crit = +100.0°C, hyst = +97.0°C)

Enable LEDs and reboot button

Check out the apu-led-button repository on Github.

Use max. cpufreq

Ubuntu will always set the CPU governor to ondemand during boot.

# cat /proc/cpuinfo
vendor_id	: AuthenticAMD
model name	: AMD G-T40E Processor
cpu MHz		: 800.000

For the APU this means the CPU will be run at 800 MHz instead of 1 GHz. If you prefer the CPU to run at full speed at all times:

# wget -O /usr/local/sbin https://gist.githubusercontent.com/trick77/21cfc65c769609be29e2/raw/076e21c7b844a9eeb67ca4184544ec27d11164f7/gov

Insert into /etc/rc.local just above exit 0 :

/usr/local/sbin/gov performance

Or as an alternative, just disable the Ubuntu ondemand init script from the command line:

# update-rc.d ondemand disable
# cat /proc/cpuinfo
vendor_id	: AuthenticAMD
model name	: AMD G-T40E Processor
cpu MHz		: 1000.000

Enable beep

apt-get install beep
modprobe pcspkr && echo pcspkr >> /etc/modules

Comment pcspkr in /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf to unblacklist the module.

Imperial March:

beep -l 350 -f 392 -D 100 -n -l 350 -f 392 -D 100 -n -l 350 -f 392 -D 100 -n -l 250 -f 311.1 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 466.2 -D 100 -n -l 350 -f 392 -D 100 -n -l 250 -f 311.1 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 466.2 -D 100 -n -l 700 -f 392 -D 100 -n -l 350 -f 587.32 -D 100 -n -l 350 -f 587.32 -D 100 -n -l 350 -f 587.32 -D 100 -n -l 250 -f 622.26 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 466.2 -D 100 -n -l 350 -f 369.99 -D 100 -n -l 250 -f 311.1 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 466.2 -D 100 -n -l 700 -f 392 -D 100 -n -l 350 -f 784 -D 100 -n -l 250 -f 392 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 392 -D 100 -n -l 350 -f 784 -D 100 -n -l 250 -f 739.98 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 698.46 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 659.26 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 622.26 -D 100 -n -l 50 -f 659.26 -D 400 -n -l 25 -f 415.3 -D 200 -n -l 350 -f 554.36 -D 100 -n -l 250 -f 523.25 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 493.88 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 466.16 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 440 -D 100 -n -l 50 -f 466.16 -D 400 -n -l 25 -f 311.13 -D 200 -n -l 350 -f 369.99 -D 100 -n -l 250 -f 311.13 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 392 -D 100 -n -l 350 -f 466.16 -D 100 -n -l 250 -f 392 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 466.16 -D 100 -n -l 700 -f 587.32 -D 100 -n -l 350 -f 784 -D 100 -n -l 250 -f 392 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 392 -D 100 -n -l 350 -f 784 -D 100 -n -l 250 -f 739.98 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 698.46 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 659.26 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 622.26 -D 100 -n -l 50 -f 659.26 -D 400 -n -l 25 -f 415.3 -D 200 -n -l 350 -f 554.36 -D 100 -n -l 250 -f 523.25 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 493.88 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 466.16 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 440 -D 100 -n -l 50 -f 466.16 -D 400 -n -l 25 -f 311.13 -D 200 -n -l 350 -f 392 -D 100 -n -l 250 -f 311.13 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 466.16 -D 100 -n -l 300 -f 392.00 -D 150 -n -l 250 -f 311.13 -D 100 -n -l 25 -f 466.16 -D 100 -n -l 700 -f 392

Setting up a Huawei E3276-150 4G/LTE USB modem on Ubuntu Server/Desktop

I just received an unlocked Huawei E3276s-150 4G/LTE USB modem/surfstick I bought on eBay the other day. I went for the E3276s-150 because the 150 seemed to be the most compatible option for European 4G mobile networks. There are even cheaper Huawei E3276 models like the E3276-920 which you can buy for less than 20 bucks. However, the 920 seems to be frequency-optimized for Asian mobile networks and may not perform as well as a E3276s-150 in Western Europe.
huawei_e3276_lte_cat4_usb_dongle
To my great surprise, setting up the Huawei E3276 on Ubuntu 15.04 Desktop was literally plug & play. After a few seconds after plugging it in, I was greeted with a “Connection Established” message. Nicely done, Canonical!

On Ubuntu Server, like most Huawei modems, the stick is recognised as a memory card reader. It has to be switched to a USB modem device first using the usb_modeswitch command in order to establish a mobile network connection. If it’s not already installed, usb_modeswitch can be installed using apt-get -y install usb-modeswitch.

Memory card reader mode:

drfalken@wopr:~# lsusb
Bus 001 Device 007: ID 12d1:1f01 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.

To turn the E3276 into a modem:

drfalken@wopr:~# usb_modeswitch -v 12d1 -p 1f01 -M '55534243123456780000000000000011062000000101000100000000000000'

If the change was successful, lsusb shows a different USB product id now:

drfalken@wopr:~# lsusb
Bus 001 Device 007: ID 12d1:14db Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.

At the same time, dmesg should output something like this:

drfalken@wopr:~# dmesg -T
[Fri May 29 20:55:41 2015] usb 1-1: New USB device found, idVendor=12d1, idProduct=14db
[Fri May 29 20:55:41 2015] usb 1-1: New USB device strings: Mfr=2, Product=1, SerialNumber=0
[Fri May 29 20:55:41 2015] usb 1-1: Product: HUAWEI Mobile
[Fri May 29 20:55:41 2015] usb 1-1: Manufacturer: HUAWEI Technology
[Fri May 29 20:55:41 2015] cdc_ether 1-1:1.0 eth1: register 'cdc_ether' at usb-0000:00:14.0-1, CDC Ethernet Device, 57:2d:70:33:22:10

Since the modem registered itself on eth1 (the name depends on the number of network devices, it doesn’t HAVE to be on eth1), we now simply fetch an IP address from the modem using:

drfalken@wopr:~# dhclient -v eth1
Internet Systems Consortium DHCP Client 4.2.4
Copyright 2004-2012 Internet Systems Consortium.
All rights reserved.
For info, please visit https://www.isc.org/software/dhcp/

Listening on LPF/eth1/57:2d:70:33:22:10
Sending on   LPF/eth1/57:2d:70:33:22:10
Sending on   Socket/fallback
DHCPDISCOVER on eth1 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 3 (xid=0x3b73326b)
DHCPREQUEST of 192.168.1.100 on eth1 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 (xid=0x3b73326b)
DHCPOFFER of 192.168.1.100 from 192.168.1.1
DHCPACK of 192.168.1.100 from 192.168.1.1
bound to 192.168.1.100 -- renewal in 36557 seconds.

Yay, the modem has made itself available on 192.168.1.100 (it even has a web interface on port 80) with a /24 prefix and a gateway at 192.168.1.1.
By the way, make sure none of your local networks use 192.168.1.0/24 or it will collide with the Huawei’s local network.

Depending on a few factors dhclient may or may not have changed the default gateway. If the default gateway points to the modem, it will be at 192.168.1.1 on eth1:

drfalken@wopr:~# ip route show | grep default
default via 192.168.1.1 dev eth1

If this is not the case, you may have to remove the existing default gateway and replace it using:

drfalken@wopr:~# ip route del default ; ip route add default via 192.168.1.1

And… connected!

drfalken@wopr:~# ping 8.8.8.8
PING 8.8.8.8 (8.8.8.8) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_seq=1 ttl=57 time=22.7 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_seq=2 ttl=57 time=34.9 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_seq=3 ttl=57 time=39.7 ms

Make sure /etc/resolv.conf contains a valid nameserver if you can’t resolve domain names.

To switch the Huawei E3276 into a modem at boot time, create /etc/udev/rules.d/70-usb-modeswitch.rules and insert this line:

ACTION=="add", SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTRS{idVendor}=="12d1", ATTRS{idProduct}=="1f01", RUN+="/usr/sbin/usb_modeswitch -v 12d1 -p 1f01 -M '55534243123456780000000000000011062000000101000100000000000000'"

To automatically add a valid nameserver in /etc/resolv.conf when eth1 comes up, add these lines to /etc/dhcp/dhclient.conf:

interface "eth1" {
  prepend domain-name-servers 8.8.8.8;
  request subnet-mask, broadcast-address, time-offset, routers,
          domain-name, domain-name-servers, domain-search, host-name,
          dhcp6.name-servers, dhcp6.domain-search,
          netbios-name-servers, netbios-scope, interface-mtu,
          rfc3442-classless-static-routes, ntp-servers,
          dhcp6.fqdn, dhcp6.sntp-servers;
  require routers, domain-name-servers;
}

If you don’t want to run dhclient manually, you can either add an eth1 dhcp section in /etc/network/interfaces or add the dhclient eth1 command to /etc/rc.local.

Just FYI: I’ve been using Vivid Vervet’s (Ubuntu 15.04) 3.19 kernel in Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS. Vivid’s newer kernel can be installed using apt-get install linux-image-generic-lts-vivid. Not sure if it makes a difference compared to 14.04’s default kernel though.

How to install Kodi on an ODROID-C1 as a standalone mediacenter

The ODROID-C1 ist just too cool not to have. This feature-packed ARM7 quad core Linux mini computer comes with an incredible price tag of $35. However, with all the accessories (RTC-battery, power supply, case, mini-HDMI cable, eMMC card, remote control…) and shipping from Korea, the final price is around $100. It’s going to replace my Raspberry Pi which I initially intended to use as a media center but it always felt a little too slow for the task, even with the highly tuned Raspbmc.

Since I wanted the ODROID-C1 to run Kodi without a desktop manager (but with an Ubuntu repository), I started off with the Ubuntu 14.04 minimal image provided by Hardkernel. Don’t forget to resize the root partition to its true size once the ODROID-C1 is up and running (and reboot again!). I’m recommending the Odroid-Utility for doing this. And while you’re at it, make sure to “Update udev rules for ODROID subdevices” in the “Update your Kernel/Firmware” menu. If you forget this step, Kodi might abort with ERROR: failed to initialize egl display.

odroid-c1-kodi-summary

I’m assuming here that the ODROID-C1 has network connectivity and you’re logged in as root.

With a few adaptations, this information was taken from my existing post on how to install Kodi on an Ubuntu 14.04 server. Continue reading

How to install Kodi on Ubuntu Server 14.04

I have a small Shuttle Barbebone computer which I’m mainly using as a KVM hypervisor on top of Ubuntu Server 14.04 to run a few VMs. Since the Barebone also sports a HDMI port and the CPU comes with an integrated Intel HD GPU I thought it would be a great Kodi (ex XBMC) mediacenter as well. However, I’ve been unable to find a working walk-through on how to install it on Ubuntu Server. Most likely because nobody ever does this on a server OS. Anyway, here’s how to install the latest Kodi release on Ubuntu Server 14.04 including hardware acceleration for the Intel HD GPU. Continue reading

QEMU on Haswell causes spurious MCE events

A few dozen times each day, the Xeon E3-1275 v3 CPU on my SuperMicro X10SLM-F board generates a Machine Check Event (MCE). The Linux kernel logs all MCEs in /var/log/syslog:

mce: [Hardware Error]: Machine check events logged
mce: [Hardware Error]: Machine check events logged
CMCI storm detected: switching to poll mode
CMCI storm subsided: switching to interrupt mode
mce_notify_irq: 14 callbacks suppressed
mce: [Hardware Error]: Machine check events logged
mce: CPU supports 9 MCE banks
mce: [Hardware Error]: Machine check events logged

After installing mcelog I was able to pull some more detailed information about the check events:

Hardware event. This is not a software error.
MCE 0
CPU 3 BANK 0
TIME 1415087019 Tue Nov  4 08:43:39 2014
MCG status:
MCi status:
Corrected error
Error enabled
MCA: Internal parity error
STATUS 90000040000f0005 MCGSTATUS 0
MCGCAP c09 APICID 6 SOCKETID 0
CPUID Vendor Intel Family 6 Model 60

The MCEs all look the same (affected is always BANK 0), just the CPU and the APICID may differ. I updated the BIOS, replaced the ECC RAM, replaced the mainboard but the errors kept showing up. Continue reading

OS X Yosemite installer shows blank/black screen when using Clover

This is a heads up for everybody with an Nvidia GTX 760 (other Nvidia cards may be affected as well) trying to install OS X Yosemite 10.10 using Clover on a Hackintosh. If you’re getting a blank/black screen at the start of the installation, try to add the boot flag nv_disable=1. My screen was getting dark just after the installer displayed DSMOS has arrived when using the -v verbose boot flag. It always happened right after the installer was switching from text mode to graphics mode.

        <key>Boot</key>
        <dict>
                <key>Arguments</key>
                <string>dart=0 -v kext-dev-mode=1 nv_disable=1</string>
        ...(more)

Once OS X Yosemite has been installed, the nv_disable boot flag is no longer required and should be removed.

Native Gigabit PCI-e Network Adapter / NIC for OS X

Here’s an overview of natively supported PCI-e (64-bit) network interface controllers (NIC) for OS X. I’ve had the chance to test some of them in my current Hackintosh build.

HP NC360T PCI-Express PRO/1000

The HP NC360T dual port PCI-e network adapter works out of the box in OS X. However, since OS X 10.8.2 Apple changed something in the driver resulting in a link loss whenever the network is under considerable load. If this happens, the network can be brought back to life by deactivating/reactivating the network in OS X’s control panel. Do not buy this network card if you intend to use it in a recent OS X version.
nc360t-pci-e-dual-port Continue reading

New Hackintosh build based on GIGABYTE GA-Z97X-UD5H

Updated 2015-10-21: This rig still works and performs awesomely on OS X El Capitan 10.11! I’m able to run it without any unsigned drivers and full system protection. csrutil says “System Integrity Protection status: enabled.”

My ASUS P6T Hackintosh died because of a busted capacitor on the motherboard. I had to decide wether to buy an Apple desktop computer or to build a new Hackintosh. I would have bought an (internally) expandable Mac Pro but the current trash can just doesn’t appeal to me.

I had three goals for the new build:

  • Since kernel extension signing is mandatory in OS X Yosemite (at least in the dev previews/public beta versions), it has to be as vanilla as possible.
  • Noise-free
  • Expandability

So, without further ado, here’s the new build:

The Z97X-UD5H uses Intel’s latest 9 Series chipset which to this date is not being used in any Apple computer. There’s a good chance Apple will use this chipset in the next iMac refresh in Q3/Q4 ’14. Even though the chipset is not officially supported in OS X, it runs just fine, even without a custom DSDT/SSDT! Continue reading

Best USB 3.0 controller for a Hackintosh

My rather dated ASUS P6T based Hackintosh lacked USB 3.0, a feature I really wanted because I already own an external USB 3 SSD drive which I’m using on my notebook. Quite a while ago, I bought this dirt cheap PCI-express 4 port USB card for $11 on eBay. However, the controller didn’t work on OS X no matter what (MultiBeast-)driver I tried. The connected SSD drive finally showed up once I applied some obscure XHCI compatibility settings to the .plist of the Apple USB driver but transferring files from/to the drive was beyond slow.

Last week, I noticed an USB 3 related entry in the MultiBeast release notes:

Added USB 3.0 – Universal which is RehabMan’s branch of Zenith432’s GenericUSBXHCI.kext

Once I installed this new driver using the latest MultiBeast and rebooted my Hackintosh, my external SSD started working like a treat! While I have no idea if this $11 controller is the best Hackintosh USB 3.0 controller (that was just a bait to lure you in) it’s still a good bang for your buck. This controller/driver combo might even work on a Mac Pro, which to this date still don’t have USB 3 support.

usb3-controller-hackintosh

Kudos go out to everyone involved in creating this universal USB 3 driver. You’re awesome!