How to bypass Lycamobile’s tethering block in Linux

I’ve been trying to get my Huawei E3276-150 4G/LTE USB modem to work with my PC Engines APU2 router board for quite a while. Once connected, the Huawei modem creates its own network thanks to its HiLink mode and is detected as an Ethernet over USB device in Linux. All I have to do is to ask the modem’s DHCP server for an IP address, use the modem as the default gateway and I should be all set. Right? Continue reading “How to bypass Lycamobile’s tethering block in Linux”

PC Engines APU1 vs APU2 UnixBench benchmark

Here’s a UnixBench performance comparison between PC Engines APU1 vs the brand new APU2. Both system boards are equipped with 4 GB of RAM and a 16 GB mSATA SSD. While the APU1 sports a dual core AMD G series T40E CPU, the APU2 comes with a AMD G series GX-412TC quad core CPU.

apu2b4_board
Continue reading “PC Engines APU1 vs APU2 UnixBench benchmark”

Best budget Linux laptop 2016

Recently, I’ve replaced my five year old 13″ MacBook Air with a new budget Linux laptop. Since I’ve been using Linux desktops more and more there was just no point in buying another Apple product. The time was ripe to go fully Linux on my to-go laptop.

When I started evaluating laptops I quickly realized that even in 2016 it’s still nearly impossible to buy a new laptop with full Linux driver support. Linux and mobile hardware support is somewhat like a good red wine, it gets better over time. One notable exception is the Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition which comes with a preloaded Ubuntu Desktop operating system. I’m not sure if Dell still sells an updated version of the Developer Edition model but it was not available in my country and I didn’t want to shell out more than $800 for my new laptop anyway.

Best budget Linux laptop

When it comes to portable computers, I’m probably kinda old-school. I don’t need a touch screen (fingerprints everywhere, eeek!) or some funky 2-in-1 tablet/laptop convertible like the Dell Yoga. Just a slim, lightweight 13″ laptop with a nice display (preferably matte), a battery-friendly processor, flash-based storage and a couple of full-size USB 3.0 ports for a decent price. After looking at a half dozen or so potential candidates I’ve set my eyes on the ASUS Zenbook UX305CA with the 6th gen. Intel Skylake mobile processor.

best budget linux laptop

Continue reading “Best budget Linux laptop 2016”

How to compile Quagga with SNMP support

Since the default Quagga package in Ubuntu doesn’t have SNMP support enabled, the Quagga package has to be compiled locally. The following instructions may work for Debian as well but I only tested it in Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS.

Now, edit /etc/quagga/daemons and enable at least zebra and bgpd and let’s create some empty config files for Quagga:
touch /etc/quagga/bgpd.conf ; touch /etc/quagga/zebra.conf

To enable SNMP support in Quagga, the line agentx has to be inserted into bgpd.conf and zebra.conf:

drfalken@wopr:/etc/quagga# head bgpd.conf
hostname AS65535
log file /var/log/quagga/bgpd.log

agentx
debug bgp events
debug bgp filters
debug bgp updates

router bgp 65535
bgp router-id 1.2.3.4

I wont dwelve into how to setup the SNMP daemon but don’t forget to add the following lines to the snmpd.conf configuration file and restart the SNMP daemon afterwards:
master agentx
agentxsocket /var/agentx/master
agentxperms 777 777

Make sure to set proper permissions for the agentx directory with a
chmod 755 /var/agentx/
or you will get error messages like snmp[warning]: Warning: Failed to connect to the agentx master agent ([NIL])

Once Quagga is able to connect to the local SNMP daemon, a message like this will show up in Quagga’s log file:
snmp[info]: NET-SNMP version 5.7.2 AgentX subagent connected

Monitoring Quagga BGP sessions using SNMP

Monitoring BGP sessions works fantastically using LibreNMS. You can chose to receive push notifications and/or emails if a BGP session goes down/up or is flapping. However, there’s some tinkering involved to display 32-bit ASNs properly in LibreNMS (let me know in the comments if you’re interested) because the MIB only handles 16-bit integers. Unfortunately, there’s no IPv6 support in Quagga’s current SNMP implementation as well.

quagga-librenms-bgp-graphs

quagga-librenms-bgp

Waking up a NAS from OS X at boot time using Wake-on-LAN (WOL)

Since OS X 10.11 El Capitan protects certain system directories from modifications, my NASwake solution to wake a NAS once the Mac starts up published back in 2010 is no longer working.

I decided against building another .pkg installer since it requires root permissions and I also prefer using Homebrew instead of some obscure binary for sending the magic WOL packet. Here are the four steps to start your Wake-on-Lan-capable NAS once your Mac starts up:

  1. Install “Homebrew” (required for the wakeonlan script)
  2. Install the wakeonlan script using the Homebrew package manager
  3. Save the naswake plist to /Library/LaunchDaemons
  4. Save the naswake shell script to /usr/local/bin and set your NAS’s MAC-address

1. Install Homebrew

See http://brew.sh for instructions. Once installed, check with brew doctor if Homebrew was installed properly.

2. Install the wakeonlan script using the Homebrew package manager

brew install wakeonlan

This will install the wakeonlan Perl script. See man wakeonlan for details.

3. Save the naswake plist to /Library/LaunchDaemons

sudo nano /Library/LaunchDaemons/com.trick77.wol2.plist

Paste the XML below into the editor.

4. Save the naswake shell script to /usr/local/bin

sudo nano /usr/local/bin/naswake.sh
sudo chmod +x /usr/local/bin/naswake.sh

Paste the script below into the editor. Don’t forget to set your NAS’ MAC address in the last line of the script!

That’s it! Make sure WOL is enabled in the NAS.