How to encrypt an ODROID-C1’s Ubuntu root filesystem with DM-crypt LUKS

The starting point is a running ORDOID-C1 with the Ubuntu minimal image. Make sure the Ubuntu installation has been dist-upgraded and to use the latest linux-image-c1 kernel image available (3.10.72-78 as of this writing). The ODROID-C1 has to be running the lastest kernel available, check with uname -r. Some of the early Ubuntu minimal images may suffer from a dist-upgrade problem, see here how to fix it. I’m using an 8 GB eMMC card but if you change the /dev ids throughout the installation process, it may work with an SD-card too.

root@c1:/# apt-get -y install lvm2 cryptsetup parted nano rsync

Since we can’t convert a running root partition, we’re going to add a 3rd partition which will be our encrypted root filesystem. Check with parted -l where the 2nd partition ends because we’re going to add the new partition right there.

root@c1:~# parted -l
Model: MMC 008G92 (sd/mmc)
Disk /dev/mmcblk0: 7818MB
Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B
Partition Table: msdos

Number Start End Size Type File system Flags
1 1049kB 135MB 134MB primary fat16 lba
2 135MB 4295MB 4160MB primary ext4

In this case, the 2nd partition ends at 4295MB, which will be the starting value for the new partition.

root@c1:~# parted
(parted) mkpart primary ext4
Start? 4295MB
END? 100%
q

Now we’re going to tag the new partition for LVM:
root@c1:~# fdisk /dev/mmcblk0
Command (m for help): t
Partition number (1-4): 3
Hex code (type L to list codes): 8e

Command (m for help): w

The next step is to setup LVM and to encrypt our new root partition. I’m going to name the physical volume (PV) lvm, the volume group vg and the logical root volume root.

root@c1:~# cryptsetup -c aes-xts-plain -y -s 512 luksFormat /dev/mmcblk0p3
root@c1:~# cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/mmcblk0p3 lvm
root@c1:~# pvcreate /dev/mapper/lvm
root@c1:~# vgcreate vg /dev/mapper/lvm
root@c1:~# lvcreate -l 100%FREE -n root vg
root@c1:~# mkfs.ext4 /dev/mapper/vg-root

Let’s try to mount the new, encrypted root volume:

root@c1:~# mount /dev/mapper/vg-root /mnt

Copy the existing root volume to the new, enrypted root volume:

root@c1:~# rsync -av --exclude=/media --exclude=/mnt --exclude=/proc --exclude=/dev --exclude=/sys / /mnt

These are the commands to chroot our new root volume from the old root partition. You can always use them to gain access to the encrypted root volume from the old root partition.

mkdir -p /mnt/dev
mkdir -p /mnt/mnt
mkdir -p /mnt/proc
mkdir -p /mnt/sys
mkdir -p /mnt/media
cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/mmcblk0p3 lvm
mount /dev/mapper/vg-root /mnt
mount -o rbind /dev /mnt/dev
mount -t proc proc /mnt/proc
mount -t sysfs sys /mnt/sys
mount -t vfat /dev/mmcblk0p1 /mnt/media
chroot /mnt

The following actions take place in the chrooted environment on the new, encrypted root LV. Make sure you don’t modify the existing root partition!

Register the encrypted volume in /etc/crypttab:

echo lvm UUID=$(cryptsetup luksUUID /dev/mmcblk0p3) none luks|tee /etc/crypttab

Add a line in /etc/fstab for the root volume:

/dev/mapper/vg-root / ext4 errors=remount-ro 0 1

Being chrooted to the encrypted volume, we can now regenerate the initrd.img using

root@c1:~# update-initramfs -u -k $(uname -r)

Since support for dm-crypt has already been built into the kernel of the minimal image, we don’t have to add any crypto-modules to /etc/initramfs-tools/modules/. initramfs also does a pretty good job (thanks to the MODULES=most setting) determining what to add for lvm and dm-crypt support. Just to make sure, let’s have a look what has been placed into the new initrd.img:

root@c1:~# lsinitramfs /boot/initrd.img-$(uname -r) | grep crypt
sbin/cryptsetup
conf/conf.d/cryptroot
scripts/local-top/cryptopensc
scripts/local-top/cryptroot
scripts/local-bottom/cryptopensc
lib/libcryptsetup.so.4
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/arch/arm/crypto
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/arch/arm/crypto/aes-arm.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/rmd160.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/seed.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/michael_mic.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/rmd320.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/cast6_generic.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/rmd128.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/rmd256.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/lzo.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/blowfish_generic.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/khazad.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/serpent_generic.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/fcrypt.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/camellia_generic.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/twofish_generic.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/async_tx
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/async_tx/async_tx.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/async_tx/async_pq.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/async_tx/async_raid6_recov.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/async_tx/async_xor.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/async_tx/async_memcpy.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/cast5_generic.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/tea.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/xts.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/xor.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/ansi_cprng.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/wp512.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/cast_common.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/tgr192.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/zlib.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/lrw.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/anubis.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/blowfish_common.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/sha512_generic.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/twofish_common.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/salsa20_generic.ko
lib/modules/3.10.72-78/kernel/crypto/gf128mul.ko
lib/cryptsetup
lib/cryptsetup/askpass
lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf/libgcrypt.so.11

Looking good, the scripts/local-top/cryptroot script is now part of initrd.img. It will be called during the first phase of the Linux boot and ask for the root volume passphrase once initramfs is executed.

To update the uInitrd file in the FAT32 boot partition we first have to recreate the image using the new initrd.img containing lvm and crypto support:

root@c1:~# mkimage -A arm -O linux -T ramdisk -C none -a 0 -e 0 -n "uInitrd $(uname -r)" -d /boot/initrd.img-$(uname -r) /tmp/uInitrd-$(uname -r)

If everything went well, copy the uInitrd to /boot and /media:

root@c1:~# cp /tmp/uInitrd-$(uname -r) /boot
root@c1:~# cp /tmp/uInitrd-$(uname -r) /media/uInitrd

Edit /media/boot.ini (make a backup copy first) and replace the root UUID and add cryptdevice in the setenv booargs line:

# Boot Arguments
setenv bootargs "root=/dev/mapper/vg-root cryptdevice=/dev/mmcblk0p3:lvm ...and so on

Important: leave the rest of the setenv bootargs line intact!

That’s it.

root@c1:~# shutdown -r now

initramfs should now aks for the passphrase to decrypt the root volume during boot. Make sure to have a keyboard nearby ;-)

Free multi-domain SSL certificates from WoSign and HAProxy OCSP stapling

Since everyone now can get free 2-year multi-domain certificates from WoSign, I grabbed one for one of my web sites. However, WoSign’s OCSP server is located in China which may, depending on your and your server’s location, increase latency once the web browser is verifying the certificate’s revocation status. In my case from Europe:

PING ocsp6.wosign.com (111.206.66.61) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 111.206.66.61: icmp_seq=1 ttl=53 time=428 ms
64 bytes from 111.206.66.61: icmp_seq=2 ttl=53 time=347 ms
64 bytes from 111.206.66.61: icmp_seq=3 ttl=53 time=312 ms
64 bytes from 111.206.66.61: icmp_seq=4 ttl=53 time=328 ms
64 bytes from 111.206.66.61: icmp_seq=5 ttl=53 time=313 ms

OCSP stapling comes in handy to reduce the latency for the revocation status check, again, depending on your clients and your server’s location.

Here’s the all-in-one shell script in /etc/cron.daily I’m using…

  1. to create the domain’s OCSP file for HAProxy
  2. to inject the latest OCSP data into a running HAProxy instance using its stats socket
#!/bin/sh
ROOT_CERT_FILE=/etc/ssl/private/wosign-root-bundle.crt
SERVER_CERT_FILE=/etc/haproxy/certs.d/domain.crt
HAPROXY_SOCKET=/var/run/haproxy.socket
OCSP_URL=`/usr/bin/openssl x509 -in $SERVER_CERT_FILE -text | grep -i ocsp | cut -d":" -f2-2,3`
OCSP_FILE=${SERVER_CERT_FILE}.ocsp

/usr/bin/openssl ocsp -noverify -issuer $ROOT_CERT_FILE -cert $SERVER_CERT_FILE -url "$OCSP_URL" -respout $OCSP_FILE -header Host `echo "$OCSP_URL" | cut -d"/" -f3`
echo "set ssl ocsp-response $(/usr/bin/base64 -w 10000 $OCSP_FILE)" | socat stdio $HAPROXY_SOCKET

To check if OCSP stapling works:

openssl s_client -connect mydomain.xyz:443 -tls1 -tlsextdebug -status

or for SNI-only configurations:

openssl s_client -connect mydomain.xyz:443 -servername mydomain.xyz -tls1 -tlsextdebug -status

If it works, there should be an OCSP section in the response like this:

OCSP response:
======================================
OCSP Response Data:
    OCSP Response Status: successful (0x0)
    Response Type: Basic OCSP Response
    Version: 1 (0x0)
    Responder Id: C = CN, O = WoSign CA Limited, CN = WoSign Free SSL OCSP Responder(G2)
    Produced At: Mar  8 14:01:14 2015 GMT
    .
    .
    .

A few notes:

  1. HAProxy’s stats socket needs to be enabled
  2. wosign-root-bundle.crt was taken from the Apache bundle in the certificate .zip file I received from WoSign
  3. /etc/haproxy/certs.d/domain.crt contains the private key and the certificate bundle from the “for Other Server” directory, however you could remove the last certificate since it’s the root CA cert.
  4. Requires HAProxy >= 1.5
  5. If socat is missing: apt-get install socat in Debian/Ubuntu
  6. Always aim for an A or A+ grade: SSL Server Test

How to set up a transparent VPN Internet gateway tunnel using OpenVPN

I created a transparent VPN Internet gateway tunnel (sorry, couldn’t come up with a better name for it) using OpenVPN and my new Odroid-C1 Linux mini computer. However, this will work with any Linux PC (including the Raspberry Pi). The beauty of a transparent VPN gateway is that a device in the LAN doesn’t have to know anything about the VPN. I don’t have to remember to turn on the VPN nor does it drain the battery on mobile devices to encrypt and decrypt the packets. The VPN is just “there”. On the other hand, mostly for performance reasons, I don’t want to encrypt all traffic leaving my home LAN, that’s why I didn’t set up the VPN in the existing router. vpn-gatewayI wanted to be able to choose, on a per-device basis, which devices will route their traffic unencrypted to my ISP and which devices will get their traffic encrypted and forwarded to the remote VPN server using a second gateway in my LAN. And all this without additional subnets in my LAN, VLANs or additional WiFi or Ethernet-adapters. This may not look like the brightest idea to everyone but it works for me and I wanted to document it to save time if I have to set it up again. This is not a step-by-step tutorial but should provide enough pointers to get started.

Continue reading “How to set up a transparent VPN Internet gateway tunnel using OpenVPN”

How to install Kodi on an ODROID-C1 as a standalone mediacenter

The ODROID-C1 ist just too cool not to have. This feature-packed ARM7 quad core Linux mini computer comes with an incredible price tag of $35. However, with all the accessories (RTC-battery, power supply, case, mini-HDMI cable, eMMC card, remote control…) and shipping from Korea, the final price is around $100. It’s going to replace my Raspberry Pi which I initially intended to use as a media center but it always felt a little too slow for the task, even with the highly tuned Raspbmc.

Since I wanted the ODROID-C1 to run Kodi without a desktop manager (but with an Ubuntu repository), I started off with the Ubuntu 14.04 minimal image provided by Hardkernel. Don’t forget to resize the root partition to its true size once the ODROID-C1 is up and running (and reboot again!). I’m recommending the Odroid-Utility for doing this. And while you’re at it, make sure to “Update udev rules for ODROID subdevices” in the “Update your Kernel/Firmware” menu. If you forget this step, Kodi might abort with ERROR: failed to initialize egl display.

odroid-c1-kodi-summary

I’m assuming here that the ODROID-C1 has network connectivity and you’re logged in as root.

With a few adaptations, this information was taken from my existing post on how to install Kodi on an Ubuntu 14.04 server. Continue reading “How to install Kodi on an ODROID-C1 as a standalone mediacenter”

How to set up a virtual KVM/VNC console on your OVH server

Want to install your own image on a OVH Kimsufi or SoYouStart server? Want to install an official image on your server instead of the pre-built OVH OS templates? Want to encrypt the home directory at install-time? Want to use RAID 5 using mdadm on one of those SSD equipped SoYouStart servers? Or do you want to use a more refined, custom partition layout which is not supported by the OVH partitioner? And you want this without having access to or having to pay for a KVM console?
Continue reading “How to set up a virtual KVM/VNC console on your OVH server”