How to install CoreOS on an OVH Kimsufi low-end dedicated server

Wouldn’t it be cool to build a bare-metal high availability cluster using CoreOS and a handful of DDoS-protected, €5/month Kimsufi servers from OVH? Here’s how to install CoreOS on a Kimsufi server.

At the time of this writing, OVH is not providing a CoreOS installation template for the Kimsufi servers. Since there is no virtual KVM console available for the entry level servers,  I tried to use OVH’s iPXE API. This approach would have worked well weren’t it for the CoreOS installer which tries to load binaries in the installation script after overwriting the same partition – which always results in a segfault. Also, the API is only available for the older Kimsufi 2G servers on OVH’s V6 control panel, not for the current Kimsufi servers for which OVH doesn’t provide an API at this time. Fortunately, OVH provides a “rescue mode” which lets us boot from an USB stick which is permanentely plugged in on all Kimsufi servers. Continue reading “How to install CoreOS on an OVH Kimsufi low-end dedicated server”

Native Gigabit PCI-e Network Adapter / NIC for OS X

Here’s an overview of natively supported PCI-e (64-bit) network interface controllers (NIC) for OS X. I’ve had the chance to test some of them in my current Hackintosh build.

HP NC360T PCI-Express PRO/1000

The HP NC360T dual port PCI-e network adapter works out of the box in OS X. However, since OS X 10.8.2 Apple changed something in the driver resulting in a link loss whenever the network is under considerable load. If this happens, the network can be brought back to life by deactivating/reactivating the network in OS X’s control panel. Do not buy this network card if you intend to use it in a recent OS X version.
nc360t-pci-e-dual-port Continue reading “Native Gigabit PCI-e Network Adapter / NIC for OS X”

New Hackintosh build based on GIGABYTE GA-Z97X-UD5H

Updated 2015-10-21: This rig still works and performs awesomely on OS X El Capitan 10.11! I’m able to run it without any unsigned drivers and full system protection. csrutil says “System Integrity Protection status: enabled.”

My ASUS P6T Hackintosh died because of a busted capacitor on the motherboard. I had to decide wether to buy an Apple desktop computer or to build a new Hackintosh. I would have bought an (internally) expandable Mac Pro but the current trash can just doesn’t appeal to me.

I had three goals for the new build:

  • Since kernel extension signing is mandatory in OS X Yosemite (at least in the dev previews/public beta versions), it has to be as vanilla as possible.
  • Noise-free
  • Expandability

So, without further ado, here’s the new build:

The Z97X-UD5H uses Intel’s latest 9 Series chipset which to this date is not being used in any Apple computer. There’s a good chance Apple will use this chipset in the next iMac refresh in Q3/Q4 ’14. Even though the chipset is not officially supported in OS X, it runs just fine, even without a custom DSDT/SSDT! Continue reading “New Hackintosh build based on GIGABYTE GA-Z97X-UD5H”

strongSwan 5 based IPSec VPN, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and PSK/XAUTH

I prefer strongSwan over Openswan because it’s still in active development, easier to setup and doesn’t require a L2TP daemon. I prefer a simple IKEv1 setup using PSK and XAUTH over certificates. If you plan to share your VPN server with your friends it’s also a lot easier to setup for them without certificates. I haven’t tried the VPN configuration below with non-Apple clients but it works well with iOS and OS X clients. Make sure to use the Cisco IPSec VPN profile, not the L2TP over IPSec profile you need for Openswan. While strongSwan works well with KVM and Xen containers, it probably won’t work with non-virtualised containers like OpenVZ or LXC. Continue reading “strongSwan 5 based IPSec VPN, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and PSK/XAUTH”

LXC 1.0 Web Panel for Ubuntu 14.04

LXC is awesome! You can create and start your own virtual container with just 3 commands in Ubuntu 14.04.

apt-get install lxc debootstrap lxc-templates
lxc-create -t ubuntu -n demo
lxc-start -n demo -d

It doesn’t get any easier than this. There’s even a Boostrap-based fronted available: LXC Web Panel.

lxc-web-panel

Unfortunately, LXC Web Panel doesn’t work with LXC 1.0 which is part of Ubuntu 14.04. Fortunately though, there’s a fork available on GitHub which adds support for LXC 1.0:

https://github.com/claudyus/LXC-Web-Panel

I re-forked claudyus’ LXC Web Panel fork and added support for Ubuntu 14.04 and a few other things. My forked fork is available here: https://github.com/trick77/LXC-Web-Panel Claudyus has already updated his repository with my changes.

By the way, the original author of LXC Web Panel said he’s currently working on a Bootstrap 3 based version for LXC 1.0 which will include a RESTful API and other new features. Make sure to follow this guy on GitHub: https://github.com/googley